Tellus Science Museum

Have you ever touched Dinosaur Poop? You can at Tellus Science Museum!

Have you ever touched Dinosaur Poop? You can at Tellus! Did you know there is a 120,000 square foot, world class science museum less than an hour’s drive from us? A short easy trip to Cartersville will land you at Tellus Museum. My first thought was that the name stood for “Tell Us” as in telling people all about science. But actually Tellus is the Latin word for Earth. Originally The Weinman Mineral Museum stood on this spot in Cartersville where the Tellus now stands. The museum did a huge expansion and reopened in 2009 with four magnificent galleries, including The Weinman. I recently went for a visit with Robb, Eva & Mikayla and we had a blast! The adventure starts as soon as you arrive in the lot. The kids eyes will open wide when they see some of the vehicles already parked there; massive construction equipment, including the biggest dump truck/earth mover you’ve ever seen! Take a short walk down the garden pathway to the entrance and you have arrived! The minute you walk into the welcoming lobby you see a huge pendulum swinging. Foucault Pendulum was named for French physicist Léon Foucault The swinging pendulum moves in a clockwise motion with a slightly changing pattern to reflect the rotation of the earth. Every fifteen minutes the movement has changed enough to knock down one of the domino shaped blocks that are placed in a circle around the pendulum. At the end of each 24 hour period, all 126 colored dominos are knocked over. In the morning, the first staff member who arrives at the museum gets the honor of setting all the blocks back up! We dug for fossils, and panned for gems. We found some of both and we got to keep them! We also looked at beautiful rocks and minerals from around the world. I happen to love rocks, so this part of the museum was my favorite. My Big Back Yard is a play and experiment center for the younger kids where they can explore lights and shadows, mirrors, and magnets with all kinds of hands on activities. The Science in Motion Gallery is a display of transportation throughout history, featuring spaceships, cars and planes. It will appeal to the history and auto buffs out there. The most amazing display was the massive dinosaur skeletons! The nine foot wide jaws of a Megalodon were so huge, our teen reporter, Mikayla could have fit inside them! These prehistoric sharks ruled the oceans and were bigger than a school bus! It was also around this area, where we saw a big pile of… uhm.. stuff that you could touch and guess what it was. After you guessed you opened a door to reveal the answer, and I’m gonna spoil if for you here, but that “stuff” was fossilized dinosaur poop! While visiting the Tyrannosaurus skeleton, we ran into Mary Anning. (Okay, it wasn’t REALLY Mary, it was someone portraying her) Mary gave us a gift of a real shark tooth! Back in the 1800′s, Mary was an English paleontologist. She described herself as the most famous female that nobody every heard of. That was because being a woman in those days kept her from recognition for her great accomplishments. Mary made her first impressive fossil find when she was just twelve years old! Her contributions to the scientific community weren’t recognized until after her death. It certainly was cool to meet her “in person.” My friend Eva, who is working on becoming self-sustaining, loved the Solar House. This compact living environment had everything you need, in a small, but comfortable space, and it all worked with solar panels! It was an exhibit, but I just knew that Eva wanted to move in! The museum has six permanent exhibits that will educate and entertain everyone in the whole family, from baby to senior. There is also a planetarium and a cafe. The displays may change so check their Facebook and website for the latest things to see. Open seven days a week from 10am til 5pm except for holidays. There is a charge to get in. Call 770-606-5700 for info. 100 Tellus Dr, Cartersville, GA. For your navigation system, put in Mineral Museum Drive, Cartersville, GA. http://tellusmuseum.org Make sure you tell ‘em we sent you!

Tellus Science Museum